Can afib be treated without drugs?

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Rocky Kautzer asked a question: Can afib be treated without drugs?
Asked By: Rocky Kautzer
Date created: Thu, May 20, 2021 5:09 AM
Date updated: Fri, Sep 23, 2022 1:41 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Can afib be treated without drugs»

Treat AFib naturally

AFib is quite common. There are many resources for those who have it. Whether you opt for medical treatments or natural alternatives, your condition will likely improve with some basic lifestyle changes.

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The concern is that if blood pressure is not aggressively managed in A-Fib patients then their arrhythmias may become even more difficult to treat in the future. Fortunately, if caught early, I have found that most cases of high blood pressure can be treated without medications. I know this was the case with me.

For atrial fibrillation alone a patient may be taking a blood thinner (Warfarin), a beta blocker to slow the heart rate, a calcium channel blocker, digoxin (which is in question now that it has been shown to increase mortality among a-fib patients), and a heart rhythm drug, not to mention drugs to help control diabetes (metformin) and hypertension (ACE inhibitor, diuretic), and a statin cholesterol-lowering drug, and at least one other drug to handle the side effects such as an ...

A Non-Drug Treatment for Afib That’s Surprisingly Effective. By R. Todd Hurst, MD, FACC Board-certified cardiologist October 8, 2018. From the WebMD Archives. JoAnne is a patient of mine who has...

Cardiac ablation may correct the arrhythmia without the need for medications or implantable devices. Your doctor may recommend this procedure if you have atrial fibrillation and an otherwise normal heart and medication has not improved your symptoms.

Currently, if you have AFib, your doctor will discuss medications and possible surgical approaches—and, if you’re lucky, mention lifestyle. The new research suggests that the order should be the opposite—the first line of treatment for someone with AFib is to treat the risk factors, including obesity, that led to it.

Yes. Talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of treating AFib with medication or ablation. Your medical history will be a factor. Certain AFib medications may not be safe if:

A 2012 study investigated claims that the wenxin keli was effective in suppressing AFib. It now holds the title of the first state-sanctioned traditional Chinese medicine-based antiarrhythmic drug.

It prevents the signals from getting to the atria to cause the fibrillation. Most people who have this procedure no longer have AFib and no longer need to take antiarrhythmic drugs.

For people with AFib who are nonetheless at low risk for stroke, anticoagulant drugs are just not worth taking. Now a new study finds that many doctors prescribe them for just these kinds of patients. Researchers examined the records of 11,000 AFib patients in 76 cardiology practices across 33 states.

AFib can be treated with oral medications that regulate the heart rhythm. Some patients require a procedural intervention called ablation to achieve control of their AFib and its symptoms. Ablation...

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Video answer: 2015 atrial fibrillation patient conference: treating afib w/ medications: mintu turakhia, md, fhrs

2015 atrial fibrillation patient conference: treating afib w/ medications: mintu turakhia, md, fhrs