Fixed drug reaction?

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Bertha Lindgren asked a question: Fixed drug reaction?
Asked By: Bertha Lindgren
Date created: Sun, Jan 3, 2021 12:19 AM
Date updated: Fri, Dec 9, 2022 11:40 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Fixed drug reaction»

The term fixed drug eruption (FDE) describes the development of one or more annular or oval erythematous patches as a result of systemic exposure to a drug; these reactions normally resolve with hyperpigmentation and may recur at the same site with reexposure to the drug.

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Fixed drug eruption is a distinctive cutaneous allergic reaction that characteristically recurs at the same site(s) on re-exposure to the medication or other chemical agent. Fixed drug eruption Targetoid fixed drug eruption

Fixed Drug Reaction Urticaria, Drug Hypersensitivity Rashes, Nodules and Tumors, and Atrophic Diseases. A fixed drug reaction appears at the... Side Effects of Drugs Annual 28. Loratadine caused a fixed drug reaction in an 8-year-old boy with perennial rhinitis,... A Worldwide Yearly Survey of New ...

The term fixed drug eruption (FDE) describes the development of one or more annular or oval erythematous patches as a result of systemic exposure to a drug; these reactions normally resolve with...

Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is an adverse drug reaction that is described as well-circumscribed, round, dusky erythematous macules and plaques on cutaneous or mucosal surfaces often accompanied by burning or pruritus.

Fixed drug reactions, are common and so named because they recur at the same site with each exposure to a particular medication. Medications inducing fixed drug eruptions are usually those taken intermittently.

Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a well-defined, circular, hyperpigmenting plaque that recurs as one or a few lesions always in fixed locations upon ingestion of a drug. FDE commonly occurs on the genitals, lips, trunk, and hands.

Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a distinctive type of cutaneous drug reaction that characteristically recurs in the same locations upon reexposure to the offending drug. Acute FDE usually presents with a single or a small number of dusky red or violaceous plaques that resolve leaving postinflammatory hyperpigmentation ( picture 1A-C ).

A fixed drug eruption (FDE) is an adverse cutaneous reaction to an ingested drug, characterized by the formation of a solitary, but at times multiple, plaque, bulla, or erosion; if the patient is rechallenged with the offending drug, the FDE occurs repeatedly at the identical skin site (i.e., fixed) within hours of ingestion.

A fixed drug eruption that developed cross-sensitivity among amide local anaesthetics, including mepivacaine hydrochloride, lidocaine hydrochloride and propitocaine hydrochloride. J Eur Acad...

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