Opinion: does religion have a place in medicine?

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Sylvan Thiel asked a question: Opinion: does religion have a place in medicine?
Asked By: Sylvan Thiel
Date created: Tue, May 11, 2021 9:04 PM
Date updated: Sat, Nov 26, 2022 3:20 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Opinion: does religion have a place in medicine»

No, according to a growing number of physicians and ethicists,1-4 who suggest that religion and prayer do not necessarily fall outside the bailiwick of modern-day Western medicine—or at least that the issue is complex and nuanced. If asked by a patient, would you participate in shared prayer?

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No, according to a growing number of physicians and ethicists, 1-4 who suggest that religion and prayer do not necessarily fall outside the bailiwick of modern-day Western medicine—or at least ...

Medicine and religion have been closely intertwined since the beginning of recorded history, with treatments offered by healers within the framework of the

Important social movements and charitable organizations have drawn their inspiration from religion and spirituality. Medicine has a similarly rich history of partnership with faith-based initiatives, as many hospitals and service groups rely on the support of religious communities. 8 Nadia Islam and Shilpa Patel share their experiences and offer best practices in building partnerships with ethnic minority-serving religious institutions to improve the health of Asian immigrants and Muslim ...

Religion and spirituality have been linked to medicine and to healing for centuries. However, in the early 1900's the Flexner report noted that there was no place for religion in medicine; that medicine was strictly a scientific field, not a theological or philosophical one. In the mid to the latter …

The latest issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics is out, and in it, Professor Nigel Biggar—an Oxford theologian—argues that “religion” should have a place in secular medicine (click here for a link to the article). Some people will feel a shiver go down their spines—and not only the non-religious.

In the sense of a medical body of knowledge and practice that pretends to be rational—and so to command the consent of all reasonable people—by excluding religious belief, no, it should not. Empirical medical science raises questions that are not susceptible of an empirical answer.

But both religions allow for exceptions in cases of emergency or when no other options are available. Both Sunni and Shiite Muslims also do not approve of any drugs, medical dressings or implants ...

Religion and spirituality in medicine can help clinicians empathize with their patients, collaborate with hospital chaplains, and advance faith-based initiatives, hospital policy, and legislation. AMA J Ethics. 2018;20 (7):E609-612. doi: 10.1001/amajethics.2018.609. Case and Commentary.

Religion and spirituality can impact decisions regarding diet, medicines based on animal products, modesty, and the preferred gender of their health providers. Some religions have strict prayer times that may interfere with medical treatment. Healthcare providers should be respectful of a patient’s religious and spiritual needs.

The answer is yes. As modern health care has evolved, we have increasingly recognized the relevance of different forms of medicine and healing that are steeped in culture and history.

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