Topical nasal decongestants drugs?

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Lowell Reilly asked a question: Topical nasal decongestants drugs?
Asked By: Lowell Reilly
Date created: Tue, May 4, 2021 11:01 PM
Date updated: Tue, Nov 8, 2022 3:56 PM

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Video answer: Nasal decongestants - pharmacology

Nasal decongestants - pharmacology

Top best answers to the question «Topical nasal decongestants drugs»

  • ephedrine (Not available in the U.S.)
  • levmetamfetamine or L-desoxyephedrine (Vicks Vapo Inhaler)
  • naphazoline (Privine)
  • phenylephrine (Neo-Synephrine, Little Noses Decongestant Nose Drops, 4-Way Fast Acting)
  • propylhexedrine (Benzedrex Inhaler)

Video answer: Quick mnemonics for nasal decongestion drugs

Quick mnemonics for nasal decongestion drugs

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Nasal decongestants are usually either short-acting (3 to 4 hours), such as levmetamfetamine or phenylephrine, or long-acting (8 to 12 hours) such as xylometazoline and oxymetazoline. Topical decongestants (such as xylometazoline or oxymetazoline ) have a more rapid onset of action and stronger effect than oral decongestants.

Topical nasal decongestants. Engle JP(1). Author information: (1)University of Illinois, Chicago. PMID: 1375430 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Publication Types: Comparative Study; Review; MeSH Terms. Administration, Inhalation; Administration, Topical; Aerosols; Humans; Infant; Infant, Newborn; Nasal Decongestants/administration & dosage*

topical nasal decongestant medicines containing oxymetazoline hydrochloride or xylometazoline hydrochloride as a single active ingredient when applied for as an OTC New Medicine N2 application. Proposed medicines must comply with all aspects of the monograph relevant to their strength and dosage form to qualify for evaluation as an N2 application.

This OTC Medicine Monograph outlines the requirements for Australian market authorisation of topical nasal decongestant medicines containing oxymetazoline hydrochloride or xylometazoline hydrochloride as a single active ingredient when applied for as an OTC New Medicine N2 application.

Nasal antihistamines and decongestants are products that contain either an antihistamine or a decongestant, in a device suitable for nasal use. Antihistamines block the action of histamine which is released by cells in response to allergens. Nasal antihistamines relieve symptoms such as sneezing, a runny nose, or postnasal drip.

The most commonly used topical nasal decongestants are phenylephrine, oxymetazoline, and xylometazoline. When administered topically, these medications will cause a vigorous vasoconstrictive effect in the nose, resulting in increased airflow through the nose and the relief of the symptoms of congestion.

Nasal decongestants, like the products listed below, come in drop or spray form and are applied directly inside your nostrils. Oral decongestants or nasal inhalers are other available options ...

Decongestants can be administered topically, directly onto the nasal mucosa, or orally. Prolonged topical administration may produce rebound congestion. Oral decongestants can affect the cardiovascular, urinary, central nervous, and endocrine systems.

Short-acting nasal decongestants ephedrine (Not available in the U.S.) levmetamfetamine or L-desoxyephedrine (Vicks Vapo Inhaler) naphazoline (Privine) phenylephrine (Neo-Synephrine, Little Noses Decongestant Nose Drops, 4-Way Fast Acting) propylhexedrine (Benzedrex Inhaler)

A number of decongestants are available in the UK. They include: Ephedrine; Oxymetazoline; Xylometazoline ; Phenylephrine; Pseudoephedrine; Ipratropium bromide; Some are available as sprays or drops that can be put into the nose (sometimes referred to as topical decongestants). Some are available to take by mouth as a tablet or syrup.

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Video answer: Antihisamines, decongestants, antitussives, and expectorants

Antihisamines, decongestants, antitussives, and expectorants