What are the side effects of bone density drugs?

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Lilla Aufderhar asked a question: What are the side effects of bone density drugs?
Asked By: Lilla Aufderhar
Date created: Tue, Feb 16, 2021 3:59 PM
Date updated: Sat, Oct 15, 2022 2:55 PM

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Video answer: Bone loss medication: what are the side effects?

Bone loss medication: what are the side effects?

Top best answers to the question «What are the side effects of bone density drugs»

Side effects for all the bisphosphonates (alendronate, ibandronate, risedronate and zoledronic acid) may include bone, joint or muscle pain. Side effects of the oral tablets may include nausea, difficulty swallowing, heartburn, irritation of the esophagus (tube connecting the throat to the stomach) and gastric ulcer.

Video answer: Fda urges caution over long-term use of bone-density-building drugs

Fda urges caution over long-term use of bone-density-building drugs

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Considering all side effects. While this particular warning concerns a rare case event, it underscores that bone drugs — given as an injection or in pill form — are certainly not wonder drugs. For example, as part of its communication to doctors, Genentech reminds doctors about other adverse reactions, which include atypical femur fractures, osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), abdominal pain, hypertension, dyspepsia, arthralgia, nausea and diarrhea. Quite a list!

Side Effects of Bisphosphonates This class of medication is often the first-line treatment for osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates decrease the speed at which your bone is broken down. Examples of bisphosphonates include alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva), risedronate (Actonel), and zoledronic acid (Reclast).

While the common side effects of bisphosphonates — including bone, joint, or muscle pain, as well as nausea, difficulty swallowing, and heartburn for the oral drugs — may be bothersome for some,...

The main side effects are hot flashes, muscle pain, and an increased risk of blood clots in the leg (deep-vein thrombosis). Teriparatide (Forteo) is a synthetic version of parathyroid hormone that increases bone density and strength. It can reduce the risk of fractures significantly in the spine and other bones.

Bone mineral density problem #3: Thyroid Drugs If you have hypothyroidism (a sluggish thyroid), you‘re probably familiar with its troublesome symptoms: Sleepiness ; Feeling lethargic and foggy ...

Older adults are more susceptible to the side effects of these drugs, which may include dizziness, weakness, changes in blood pressure and falling. As a result, older men are at increased risk of hip fracture in the first month after starting an alpha adrenergic blocker.

Raloxifene (Evista) mimics estrogen's beneficial effects on bone density in postmenopausal women, without some of the risks associated with estrogen. Taking this drug can reduce the risk of some types of breast cancer. Hot flashes are a common side effect. Raloxifene may also increase your risk of blood clots.

Sadly, This is the Most Ridiculous and Ironic Side Effect. Perhaps the most ironic (and ridiculous) side effect of osteoporosis drugs is increased fracture risk. 3. The ostensible reason behind taking drugs for low bone density is to decrease the chances that one of your bones will break.

But within a year of its introduction, reports of adverse events, including injuries to the stomach and esophagus, began pouring in. That prompted Merck, the manufacturer, to issue revised ...

Considering all side effects. While this particular warning concerns a rare case event, it underscores that bone drugs — given as an injection or in pill form — are certainly not wonder drugs. For example, as part of its communication to doctors, Genentech reminds doctors about other adverse reactions, which include atypical femur fractures, osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), abdominal pain, hypertension, dyspepsia, arthralgia, nausea and diarrhea. Quite a list!

Side Effects of Bisphosphonates This class of medication is often the first-line treatment for osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates decrease the speed at which your bone is broken down. Examples of bisphosphonates include alendronate (Fosamax), ibandronate (Boniva), risedronate (Actonel), and zoledronic acid (Reclast).

While the common side effects of bisphosphonates — including bone, joint, or muscle pain, as well as nausea, difficulty swallowing, and heartburn for the oral drugs — may be bothersome for some,...

In some scenarios (eg, osteoporosis), these effects are intended; in others (eg, rickets, osteomalacia secondary to antiepileptic drugs), potentially adverse side effects of medications on bone may occur. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs appear to delay fracture healing and bone ingrowth, although these effects are reversible.

Bone mineral density problem #3: Thyroid Drugs If you have hypothyroidism (a sluggish thyroid), you‘re probably familiar with its troublesome symptoms: Sleepiness ; Feeling lethargic and foggy ...

Raloxifene (Evista) mimics estrogen's beneficial effects on bone density in postmenopausal women, without some of the risks associated with estrogen. Taking this drug can reduce the risk of some types of breast cancer. Hot flashes are a common side effect. Raloxifene may also increase your risk of blood clots.

Sadly, This is the Most Ridiculous and Ironic Side Effect. Perhaps the most ironic (and ridiculous) side effect of osteoporosis drugs is increased fracture risk. 3. The ostensible reason behind taking drugs for low bone density is to decrease the chances that one of your bones will break.

But within a year of its introduction, reports of adverse events, including injuries to the stomach and esophagus, began pouring in. That prompted Merck, the manufacturer, to issue revised ...

Studies in animals or humans have demonstrated fetal abnormalities and/or there is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience, and the risks involved in use in pregnant women clearly outweigh potential benefits. N. FDA has not classified the drug.

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