What is the difference between autism and autistic traits?

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Bennie Larkin asked a question: What is the difference between autism and autistic traits?
Asked By: Bennie Larkin
Date created: Thu, Jun 24, 2021 10:51 PM
Date updated: Thu, Oct 6, 2022 2:48 AM

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Top best answers to the question «What is the difference between autism and autistic traits»

They are one and the same. The Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is the clinical definition for autism. Some people chose to be referred to as “an autistic person”, while others prefer to be referred to “a person with autism”.

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What is the difference between autism and autistic? They are one and the same. The Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is the clinical definition for autism. Some people chose to be referred to as “an autistic person”, while others prefer to be referred to “a person with autism”.

@FormerlyAutistic, intellectually gifted people that are not diagnosed autistic* usually have autistic traits. I think the difference is that they also significantly retain their social instincts, while ASD proper does not. *That is still a form of neuro-diversity.

So in a reduced answer, the difference between the two is as follows. Autism. A person who has Autism lacks the ability to interact socially and may have learning disabilities, empathy, and flexible behaviors.

If the word “autistic” is analyzed for its etymology, it would mean “exibiting the traits of autism”, so saying “autistic” is merely saying “with autism” in fewer words. I can say I have a two year old daughter, but that does not imply that she is merely 2 years old at the exclusion of all of her other charateristics, abilities or disabilities.

He’s a lot of things — bright, funny, confounding, and analytical — but to some people he will never be autistic. It’s a matter of language. Person first language , to be exact.

The important distinction is that a term like ‘autistic’ implies that the child would be completely different if not for autism. In other words, autism makes a child who they are. Some also argue that this term is perhaps more reflective of reality as unlike an illness, autism will always be part of who this child is.

Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs; ie, autistic disorder, Asperger’s disorder, and pervasive developmental disorders) are characterized by deficits in social interaction, communication, and behavioral flexibility 1 and affect about 1% of the population. 2 Population-based studies have found that, in addition to the individuals with ASD, many others exhibit subthreshold autistic or autisticlike traits (ALTs), that is, problems or peculiarities in sociocommunicative behavior, perception of ...

Science has done many comparison studies between Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) brains and brains not affected. Here’s what their findings can tell us about the structure of and the interworking of the autistic brain.

Neither what was previously diagnosed as Asperger’s nor autism is a medical condition that needs to be “treated.” Those diagnosed with autism are considered “neurodivergent.” Autistic behaviors...

Both can be triggered, but they are distinct entities. Flashbacks are from sensory information causing an onslaught of memories, both conscious ones and the ones we store in our bodies. Meltdowns are from sensory or social overload. Autism also comes with restricted interests and different types of social impairments.

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