Why antibiotic resistance is an example of evolution by natural selection?

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Kyle Feeney asked a question: Why antibiotic resistance is an example of evolution by natural selection?
Asked By: Kyle Feeney
Date created: Sat, Jul 17, 2021 11:40 AM
Date updated: Thu, Oct 6, 2022 12:53 AM

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Top best answers to the question «Why antibiotic resistance is an example of evolution by natural selection»

Bacteria can evolve quickly because they reproduce at a fast rate. Antibiotics usually kill bacteria, but in this case the mutation means the bacteria cannot be destroyed by the antibiotic… The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is an example of natural selection leading to evolution .

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This is an example of natural selection. In a large population of bacteria, there may be some that are not affected by an antibiotic. These survive and reproduce - producing more bacteria that are...

A random mutation might cause some bacteria to become resistant to certain antibiotics, such as penicillin. Antibiotics usually kill bacteria, but in this case the mutation means the bacteria...

Antibiotic resistance is a stunning example of evolution by natural selection. Bacteria with traits that allow them to survive the onslaught of drugs can thrive, re-ignite infections, and launch ...

Antibiotic resistance is a consequence of evolution via natural selection. The antibiotic action is an environmental pressure; those bacteria which have a mutation allowing them to survive will ...

Add the fact that many people DO NOT use them as directed any more than most people use a surface disinfectant as directed and we have a neat little breeding ground where natural selection occurs ...

Antibiotic resistance appearance and spread have been classically considered the result of a process of natural selection, directed by the use of antibiotics. Bacteria, that have to face the antibiotic challenge, evolve to acquire resistance and, under this strong selective pressure, only the fittes …

Miller (1999) refers to the development of antibiotic resistance as an example of evolution’s “creative force.” Barlow and Hall (2002) refer to it as “the unique opportunity to observe evolutionary processes over the course of a few decades instead of the several millennia that are generally required for these processes to occur.” (p. 314)

Antibiotic treatment and the development of antibiotic resistance are artificial selection. Antibiotic treatment is not evolution, which is the consequence of unintelligent undirected unplanned natural selection. Evolution, understood in the Darwinian sense that Myers and other Darwinists intend, is precisely what antibiotic treatment is not.

The loss of deleterious recessive genes through death of homozygotes is being balanced by successful reproduction of heterozygotes. Thus, the natural selection has preserved it along with the normal haemoglobin in the malaria affected areas. It is an example of balancing or stabilizing selection. E. Antibiotic resistance in the microbes (Fig. 7.44).

Bacteria and Antibiotics: An Example of Evolution by Natural Selection. Examples of natural selection processes are well documented in life forms that have very rapid life cycles such as bacteria. Bacteria (domain Eubacteria) are tiny, single-celled prokaryotic organisms. They reproduce quickly so they evolve quickly, even within a few weeks.

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